TWO DECADES AFTER RWANDAN GENOCIDE
Emmanuel Ndayisaba, left, and Alice Mukarurinda, recount their experiences of the Rwandan genocide at Alice’s house in Nyamata, Rwanda Wednesday, March 26, 2014. She lost her baby daughter and her right hand to a manic killing spree. He wielded the machete that took both. Yet today, despite coming from opposite sides of an unspeakable shared past, Alice Mukarurinda and Emmanuel Ndayisaba are friends. She is the treasurer and he the vice president of a group that builds simple brick houses for genocide survivors. They live near each other and shop at the same market. Their story of ethnic violence, extreme guilt and, to some degree, reconciliation is the story of Rwanda today. The Rwandan government is still accused by human rights groups of holding an iron grip on power, stifling dissent and killing political opponents. But even critics give President Paul Kagame credit for leading the country toward a peace that seemed all but impossible two decades ago. (Photograph credit: Ben Curtis/AP)
Photographer profile: Ben Curtis, 40, is AP’s chief photographer and photo editor for East Africa, based in Nairobi. He has covered stories across the Middle East and Africa, including conflicts in Gaza, Lebanon, Kenya, Liberia and Iraq. He also covered the Athens Olympics in 2004 and Iran’s elections in 2009. More recently he has been working on the political upheavals in Egypt and Libya. His photographs have won a number of awards, including a World Press Photo award in 2005 for his coverage of Togolese post election violence. A dual US and British citizen, Curtis began his AP career in 2003 as a photographer in Dakar, Senegal, covering 23 countries. In 2005 he moved to Cairo as Middle East photo editor with responsibility for AP’s photo coverage across the region. Before joining AP, Curtis worked for the UK Press Association for six years in Scotland and London. Curtis holds a law degree from Sheffield University and a postgraduate photojournalism diploma from Stradbroke College, both in England.

TWO DECADES AFTER RWANDAN GENOCIDE

Emmanuel Ndayisaba, left, and Alice Mukarurinda, recount their experiences of the Rwandan genocide at Alice’s house in Nyamata, Rwanda Wednesday, March 26, 2014. She lost her baby daughter and her right hand to a manic killing spree. He wielded the machete that took both. Yet today, despite coming from opposite sides of an unspeakable shared past, Alice Mukarurinda and Emmanuel Ndayisaba are friends. She is the treasurer and he the vice president of a group that builds simple brick houses for genocide survivors. They live near each other and shop at the same market. Their story of ethnic violence, extreme guilt and, to some degree, reconciliation is the story of Rwanda today. The Rwandan government is still accused by human rights groups of holding an iron grip on power, stifling dissent and killing political opponents. But even critics give President Paul Kagame credit for leading the country toward a peace that seemed all but impossible two decades ago. (Photograph credit: Ben Curtis/AP)

Photographer profile: Ben Curtis, 40, is AP’s chief photographer and photo editor for East Africa, based in Nairobi. He has covered stories across the Middle East and Africa, including conflicts in Gaza, Lebanon, Kenya, Liberia and Iraq. He also covered the Athens Olympics in 2004 and Iran’s elections in 2009. More recently he has been working on the political upheavals in Egypt and Libya. His photographs have won a number of awards, including a World Press Photo award in 2005 for his coverage of Togolese post election violence. A dual US and British citizen, Curtis began his AP career in 2003 as a photographer in Dakar, Senegal, covering 23 countries. In 2005 he moved to Cairo as Middle East photo editor with responsibility for AP’s photo coverage across the region. Before joining AP, Curtis worked for the UK Press Association for six years in Scotland and London. Curtis holds a law degree from Sheffield University and a postgraduate photojournalism diploma from Stradbroke College, both in England.

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    TWO DECADES AFTER RWANDAN GENOCIDE Emmanuel Ndayisaba, left, and Alice Mukarurinda, recount their experiences of the...
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