A selection of Photographs and Stories from around the World
Palestinians carry their belongings after salvaging them from their destroyed houses in the heavily bombed town of Beit Hanoun, Gaza Strip, close to the Israeli border, Friday, August 1, 2014. A three-day Gaza cease-fire that began Friday quickly unraveled, with Israel and Hamas accusing each other of violating the truce. (Photograph credit: Lefteris Pitarakis/AP photo)

Palestinians carry their belongings after salvaging them from their destroyed houses in the heavily bombed town of Beit Hanoun, Gaza Strip, close to the Israeli border, Friday, August 1, 2014. A three-day Gaza cease-fire that began Friday quickly unraveled, with Israel and Hamas accusing each other of violating the truce. (Photograph credit: Lefteris Pitarakis/AP photo)

Howie and Laurel Borowick embrace in the bedroom of their home. In their thirty-four year marriage, they never could have imagined being diagnosed with stage-4 cancer at the same time. Chappaqua, New York. March 2013. (Photograph credit: Nancy Borowick via LensCulture)
The influential photography blog LensCulture announced its contest winners on Thursday July 31 for its international competition “Emerging Talents 2014.” Humanitarian photographer Nancy Borowick was named among the five grand winners of the top 50 Emerging Talents, for her ongoing project “Cancer Family”. Nancy Borowick’s black and white photographs capture the full range of her parents’ experience as they both endure cancer treatments simultaneously. "In 2013, my parents were in treatment for cancer — my mom for breast cancer and my dad for pancreatic cancer. This series documents the pain and challenges of treatment, but also focuses on their bravery in the face of mortality. With compassion and respect, I aspire to capture the full range of their experience — from the daily banter they shared as husband and wife to their shifting dynamic as patient and caregiver. While my father passed away in December, I see this project as a way to immortalize my parents, their strength in the face of illness, and their love for each other," Nancy Borowick said.

Howie and Laurel Borowick embrace in the bedroom of their home. In their thirty-four year marriage, they never could have imagined being diagnosed with stage-4 cancer at the same time. Chappaqua, New York. March 2013. (Photograph credit: Nancy Borowick via LensCulture)

The influential photography blog LensCulture announced its contest winners on Thursday July 31 for its international competition “Emerging Talents 2014.” Humanitarian photographer Nancy Borowick was named among the five grand winners of the top 50 Emerging Talents, for her ongoing project “Cancer Family”. Nancy Borowick’s black and white photographs capture the full range of her parents’ experience as they both endure cancer treatments simultaneously. "In 2013, my parents were in treatment for cancer — my mom for breast cancer and my dad for pancreatic cancer. This series documents the pain and challenges of treatment, but also focuses on their bravery in the face of mortality. With compassion and respect, I aspire to capture the full range of their experience — from the daily banter they shared as husband and wife to their shifting dynamic as patient and caregiver. While my father passed away in December, I see this project as a way to immortalize my parents, their strength in the face of illness, and their love for each other," Nancy Borowick said.

A Thai worker adjusts batches of dried silk thread after it was dyed at the decades-old Aood Baan Krua workshop, hidden away in Bangkok’s centre, that supplies silk material to upmarket stores in Thailand’s capital, Thursday, July 31, 2014. A surge in silk yarn prices has attracted more silk farmers in the last two years, the Bangkok Post reported quoting the Queen Sirikit Department of Sericulture. Most Thai silk is used in the domestic market but plans are afoot to increase production. American entrepreneur Jim Thompson revived the country’s traditional silk-weaving industry in the 1950s, overseeing the process from raising silkworms to retail sales and promoting silk as a high-fashion item around the world. Thailand’s share of world silk production is relatively modest at less than 1,000 tons a year compared with leader China, with well over 100,000 tons annually. But Thailand is noted for its hand-woven silk products, which add value and serve a luxury market separate from commercial, low-price products. (Photograph credit: Sakchai Lalit/AP)

A Thai worker adjusts batches of dried silk thread after it was dyed at the decades-old Aood Baan Krua workshop, hidden away in Bangkok’s centre, that supplies silk material to upmarket stores in Thailand’s capital, Thursday, July 31, 2014. A surge in silk yarn prices has attracted more silk farmers in the last two years, the Bangkok Post reported quoting the Queen Sirikit Department of Sericulture. Most Thai silk is used in the domestic market but plans are afoot to increase production. American entrepreneur Jim Thompson revived the country’s traditional silk-weaving industry in the 1950s, overseeing the process from raising silkworms to retail sales and promoting silk as a high-fashion item around the world. Thailand’s share of world silk production is relatively modest at less than 1,000 tons a year compared with leader China, with well over 100,000 tons annually. But Thailand is noted for its hand-woven silk products, which add value and serve a luxury market separate from commercial, low-price products. (Photograph credit: Sakchai Lalit/AP)

Reuters: “Israeli shelling killed at least 15 Palestinians sheltering in a U.N.-run school and another 17 near a street market on Wednesday, Gaza’s Health Ministry said, with no ceasefire in sight after more than three weeks of fighting.” 

UNRWA Official Statement: “Last night, children were killed as they slept next to their parents on the floor of a classroom in a UN designated shelter in Gaza. Children killed in their sleep; this is an affront to all of us, a source of universal shame. Today the world stands disgraced.” 

The Times of Israel: “UNRWA spokesman breaks down on air — UNRWA spokesman Chris Gunness loses his composure in an interview with Al-Jazeera Arabic. After making a brief statement on the state of the Gazans, saying, ‘The rights of Palestinians, even their children, are wholesale denied, and it’s appalling,’ Gunness pauses, clears his throat, says ‘my pleasure,’ and proceeds to sob uncontrollably as the camera darts away. It appears Gunness thought the interview had concluded.”

An Iranian woman looks at a mural drawing of spearmen bearing the faces of (From L to R): Iraq’s late President Saddam Hussein, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, a masked man, US President Barack Obama, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and German Chancellor Angela Merkel on a street in the Iranian capital Tehran on July 30, 2014. Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei accused Israel of committing “genocide” in Gaza, calling on the Islamic world to arm Palestinians. “This rabid dog, this rapacious wolf, has attacked innocent people and humanity must show a reaction. This is genocide, a catastrophe of historical scale,” Khamenei has said in a speech delivered on July 29, 2014 for the Eid al-Fitr prayers sermon at Tehran’s Grand Mosalla Mosque. (Photograph credit: Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images)

An Iranian woman looks at a mural drawing of spearmen bearing the faces of (From L to R): Iraq’s late President Saddam Hussein, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, a masked man, US President Barack Obama, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and German Chancellor Angela Merkel on a street in the Iranian capital Tehran on July 30, 2014. Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei accused Israel of committing “genocide” in Gaza, calling on the Islamic world to arm Palestinians. “This rabid dog, this rapacious wolf, has attacked innocent people and humanity must show a reaction. This is genocide, a catastrophe of historical scale,” Khamenei has said in a speech delivered on July 29, 2014 for the Eid al-Fitr prayers sermon at Tehran’s Grand Mosalla Mosque. (Photograph credit: Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images)

Miners pose for a photograph at the coal face inside a mine in Choa Saidan Shah, Punjab province, Pakistan, on April 29, 2014. Workers at this mine in Choa Saidan Shah dig coal with pick axes, break it up and load it onto donkeys to be transported to the surface. Employed by private contractors, a team of four workers can dig about a ton of coal a day, for which they earn around US$10 to be split between them. The coalmine is in the heart of Punjab, Pakistan’s most populous and richest province, but the labourers mostly come from the poorer neighbouring region of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Read more (Photograph credit: Sara Farid/Reuters)

Miners pose for a photograph at the coal face inside a mine in Choa Saidan Shah, Punjab province, Pakistan, on April 29, 2014. Workers at this mine in Choa Saidan Shah dig coal with pick axes, break it up and load it onto donkeys to be transported to the surface. Employed by private contractors, a team of four workers can dig about a ton of coal a day, for which they earn around US$10 to be split between them. The coalmine is in the heart of Punjab, Pakistan’s most populous and richest province, but the labourers mostly come from the poorer neighbouring region of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Read more (Photograph credit: Sara Farid/Reuters)

Yanomami warriors look out to the mountain vegetation on the flanks of Pico da Neblina (Mist Peak), Brazil’s highest mountain rising 2,994 metres (9,823 feet) above sea level, on the Brazil-Venezuela border. (Photograph credit: Sebastião Salgado/Amazonas Images/The Washington Post)
The Yanomami, an indigenous group of less than 40,000 hunter-agriculturists who live in some 550 villages, have for millennia occupied a vast stretch of tropical rainforest of northern Amazonia on both sides of the border between Venezuela and Brazil. Around two-thirds of Yanomami live in Brazil, where a landmark presidential decree signed in 1992 recognized them as rightful owners of a reserve the size of Portugal in two northern states, Roraima and Amazonas. Yet, despite this official protection, alarmed by reports that the tribe’s survival is again at risk, the Brazilian social-documentary photographer and environmental activist Sebastião Salgado, 70, traveled in March and April this year to the Yanomami region for the third time in three decades. During his last visit to the Amazon basin, Salgado portrayed several Yanomami communities. Part of his stunning photographic reportage on Yanomami people was published on Washington Post website. The Italian newspaper La Stampa has also published 14 of his photographs along with an interview of the photographer.

Yanomami warriors look out to the mountain vegetation on the flanks of Pico da Neblina (Mist Peak), Brazil’s highest mountain rising 2,994 metres (9,823 feet) above sea level, on the Brazil-Venezuela border. (Photograph credit: Sebastião Salgado/Amazonas Images/The Washington Post)

The Yanomami, an indigenous group of less than 40,000 hunter-agriculturists who live in some 550 villages, have for millennia occupied a vast stretch of tropical rainforest of northern Amazonia on both sides of the border between Venezuela and Brazil. Around two-thirds of Yanomami live in Brazil, where a landmark presidential decree signed in 1992 recognized them as rightful owners of a reserve the size of Portugal in two northern states, Roraima and Amazonas. Yet, despite this official protection, alarmed by reports that the tribe’s survival is again at risk, the Brazilian social-documentary photographer and environmental activist Sebastião Salgado, 70, traveled in March and April this year to the Yanomami region for the third time in three decades. During his last visit to the Amazon basin, Salgado portrayed several Yanomami communities. Part of his stunning photographic reportage on Yanomami people was published on Washington Post website. The Italian newspaper La Stampa has also published 14 of his photographs along with an interview of the photographer.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 9:32 a.m. GMT: A Palestinian firefighter reacts as he tries to put out a fire at Gaza’s main power plant, in the central Gaza Strip. (Photograph credit: Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
Israeli tank fire hit the fuel depot of the Gaza Strip’s only power plant early on Tuesday, witnesses said, cutting electricity to Gaza City and many other parts of the Palestinian enclave of 1.8 million people. “The power plant is finished,” its director, Mohammed al-Sharif, told Reuters. “Gaza’s sole power plant has stopped working due to Israeli shelling last night, which damaged the steam generator and later hit the fuel tanks which set them on fire,” the deputy head of Gaza’s power authority, Fathi al-Sheikh Khalil, told AFP. An Israeli military spokeswoman had no immediate comment and said she was checking the report. 
Even before the power plant shutdown, Palestinians in the Gaza Strip only had electricity for about three hours a day because fighting had damaged power lines. Gaza’s power plant, which requires some 650,000 liters of diesel fuel for its daily running, resumed its operations in mid-December following seven weeks of closure due to shortages of the fuel. Gaza receives 120 megawatts of electricity from Israel each day and buys a further 28 megawatts from Egypt, according to the Gaza Energy Authority. Since July 7, Israel has pounded the Gaza Strip — from air, land and sea — with devastating bombardments with the ostensible aim of halting rocket fire from the strip. At least 1,119 Palestinians have been killed and more than 6,550 others injured in the relentless Israeli attacks on Gaza, according to the Palestinian Health Ministry. According to official Israeli figures, 53 troops and three civilians have been killed since the hostilities began.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 9:32 a.m. GMT: A Palestinian firefighter reacts as he tries to put out a fire at Gaza’s main power plant, in the central Gaza Strip. 
(Photograph credit: Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

Israeli tank fire hit the fuel depot of the Gaza Strip’s only power plant early on Tuesday, witnesses said, cutting electricity to Gaza City and many other parts of the Palestinian enclave of 1.8 million people. “The power plant is finished,” its director, Mohammed al-Sharif, told Reuters. “Gaza’s sole power plant has stopped working due to Israeli shelling last night, which damaged the steam generator and later hit the fuel tanks which set them on fire,” the deputy head of Gaza’s power authority, Fathi al-Sheikh Khalil, told AFP. An Israeli military spokeswoman had no immediate comment and said she was checking the report.

Even before the power plant shutdown, Palestinians in the Gaza Strip only had electricity for about three hours a day because fighting had damaged power lines. Gaza’s power plant, which requires some 650,000 liters of diesel fuel for its daily running, resumed its operations in mid-December following seven weeks of closure due to shortages of the fuel. Gaza receives 120 megawatts of electricity from Israel each day and buys a further 28 megawatts from Egypt, according to the Gaza Energy Authority. Since July 7, Israel has pounded the Gaza Strip — from air, land and sea — with devastating bombardments with the ostensible aim of halting rocket fire from the strip. At least 1,119 Palestinians have been killed and more than 6,550 others injured in the relentless Israeli attacks on Gaza, according to the Palestinian Health Ministry. According to official Israeli figures, 53 troops and three civilians have been killed since the hostilities began.

A volunteer assembles a section of an installation entitled “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” by artist Paul Cummins, made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, in the moat of the Tower of London to commemorate the First World War on Monday, July 28, 2014 in London, England. Each ceramic poppy represents an allied victim of the First World War and the display is due to be completed by Armistice Day on November 11, 2014. After Armistice Day each poppy from the installation will be available to buy for 25 GBP, and the revenues will be shared equally amongst six service charities: The Royal British Legion, Confederation of Service Charities (COBSEO), Combat Stress, Coming Home, Help for Heroes, and SSAFA-National Armed Forces Charity. (Photograph credit: Oli Scarff/Getty Images) 

A volunteer assembles a section of an installation entitled “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” by artist Paul Cummins, made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, in the moat of the Tower of London to commemorate the First World War on Monday, July 28, 2014 in London, England. Each ceramic poppy represents an allied victim of the First World War and the display is due to be completed by Armistice Day on November 11, 2014. After Armistice Day each poppy from the installation will be available to buy for 25 GBP, and the revenues will be shared equally amongst six service charities: The Royal British Legion, Confederation of Service Charities (COBSEO), Combat Stress, Coming Home, Help for Heroes, and SSAFA-National Armed Forces Charity. (Photograph credit: Oli Scarff/Getty Images

The world’s largest solar-powered boat, “MS Turanor PlanetSolar" sails through the Corinth Canal near the town of Kórinthos, Greece, on Monday, July 28, 2014. The boat arrived to Greece as part of a joint archaeological project focused on underwater exploration off one of Europe’s oldest human occupation sites, the Franchthi cave overlooking the Argolic Gulf, in eastern Peloponnese. The project is taking place in one of Greece’s richest archaelogical areas, the Argolis, known for its major palatial complexes in the Bronze Age that include Mycenae and Tiryns and later, classical-era city-states and sites like Argos and the ancient-theatre site of Epidaurus. (Photograph credit: Valerie Gache/AFP/Getty Images)

The world’s largest solar-powered boat, “MS Turanor PlanetSolar" sails through the Corinth Canal near the town of Kórinthos, Greece, on Monday, July 28, 2014. The boat arrived to Greece as part of a joint archaeological project focused on underwater exploration off one of Europe’s oldest human occupation sites, the Franchthi cave overlooking the Argolic Gulf, in eastern Peloponnese. The project is taking place in one of Greece’s richest archaelogical areas, the Argolis, known for its major palatial complexes in the Bronze Age that include Mycenae and Tiryns and later, classical-era city-states and sites like Argos and the ancient-theatre site of Epidaurus. (Photograph credit: Valerie Gache/AFP/Getty Images)

Haitians participate in the first day of the Carnaval des Fleurs (Carnival of Flowers), on Sunday, July 27, 2014, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The three-day annual festival, initially launched in 2012 to spur tourism growth during the summer months, is taking place through the streets of Hatian capital’s downtown. The Carnival of Flowers is an “opportunity for Haiti to sell a better image of itself and attract tourists,” Haiti President Michel Martelly said. Last year, approximately 22,000 foreigners came to Haiti during a 10-day period that included the Carnival of Flowers, according to figures from Haiti’s Tourism Ministry. (Photograph credit: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

Haitians participate in the first day of the Carnaval des Fleurs (Carnival of Flowers), on Sunday, July 27, 2014, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The three-day annual festival, initially launched in 2012 to spur tourism growth during the summer months, is taking place through the streets of Hatian capital’s downtown. The Carnival of Flowers is an “opportunity for Haiti to sell a better image of itself and attract tourists,” Haiti President Michel Martelly said. Last year, approximately 22,000 foreigners came to Haiti during a 10-day period that included the Carnival of Flowers, according to figures from Haiti’s Tourism Ministry. (Photograph credit: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

Palestinian May Amin, 2, rides a swing while celebrating on the first day of the Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr in Gaza City, in the northern Gaza Strip, Monday, July 28, 2014. The Amin family, originally from the Shuja’iyya neighborhood of Gaza City, moved in with relatives in another part of town because of heavy Israeli strikes in their area. As Muslims began celebrating the Eid al-Fitr holiday on Monday that marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, there was mostly fear and mourning instead of holiday cheer in the Gaza Strip. (Photograph credit: Lefteris Pitarakis/AP photo)
Just hours after this photo was taken, Israeli forces bombed a park near the beach in Gaza City as well as al-Shifa hospital “killing at least 10 Palestinians including eight children,” Ma’an news agency said quoting medical sources. The Israeli army, however, said that the deaths were a result of “failed rocket attacks” launched by Palestinian militants. The strike on the park hit a playground beside the al-Shati refugee camp, while the other strike hit the outpatient clinic of al-Shifa Hospital, which is the main hospital in the besieged coastal enclave. Eyewitnesses said that 40 were also injured in the strike on the park, which some were calling an “Eid massacre,” the Palestinian news agency added.

Palestinian May Amin, 2, rides a swing while celebrating on the first day of the Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr in Gaza City, in the northern Gaza Strip, Monday, July 28, 2014. The Amin family, originally from the Shuja’iyya neighborhood of Gaza City, moved in with relatives in another part of town because of heavy Israeli strikes in their area. As Muslims began celebrating the Eid al-Fitr holiday on Monday that marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, there was mostly fear and mourning instead of holiday cheer in the Gaza Strip. (Photograph credit: Lefteris Pitarakis/AP photo)

Just hours after this photo was taken, Israeli forces bombed a park near the beach in Gaza City as well as al-Shifa hospital “killing at least 10 Palestinians including eight children,” Ma’an news agency said quoting medical sources. The Israeli army, however, said that the deaths were a result of “failed rocket attacks” launched by Palestinian militants. The strike on the park hit a playground beside the al-Shati refugee camp, while the other strike hit the outpatient clinic of al-Shifa Hospital, which is the main hospital in the besieged coastal enclave. Eyewitnesses said that 40 were also injured in the strike on the park, which some were calling an “Eid massacre,” the Palestinian news agency added.

A child walks toward the shore of the Malagueta beach at the Mediterranean Sea in Málaga, Spain, on July 27, 2014. Spain was host to 28 million foreign tourists in the first half of 2014, mostly from the UK, Germany and France — a 7.3 percent increase over the same period in 2013 according to the latest figures provided by the Spanish Institute for Tourist Studies. (Photograph credit: Jon Nazca/Reuters)

A child walks toward the shore of the Malagueta beach at the Mediterranean Sea in Málaga, Spain, on July 27, 2014. Spain was host to 28 million foreign tourists in the first half of 2014, mostly from the UK, Germany and France — a 7.3 percent increase over the same period in 2013 according to the latest figures provided by the Spanish Institute for Tourist Studies. (Photograph credit: Jon Nazca/Reuters)

Indonesian Muslims perform Eid Al-Fitr prayer on “sea of sands” at Parangkusumo beach, Monday, July 28, 2014 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Eid Al-Fitr, marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting and begins after the sighting of a new crescent moon. On this day, Muslims in around 100 countries across the globe start the day with prayer and spend time with family, offer gifts and often give to charity. (Photograph credit: Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images) 

Indonesian Muslims perform Eid Al-Fitr prayer on “sea of sands” at Parangkusumo beach, Monday, July 28, 2014 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Eid Al-Fitr, marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting and begins after the sighting of a new crescent moon. On this day, Muslims in around 100 countries across the globe start the day with prayer and spend time with family, offer gifts and often give to charity. (Photograph credit: Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

A man jogs near the “Agora” structure at the Athens Olympic complex, at the site of the Athens 2004 Olympic Games, on Sunday, July 27, 2014. (Photograph credit: Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)

A man jogs near the “Agora” structure at the Athens Olympic complex, at the site of the Athens 2004 Olympic Games, on Sunday, July 27, 2014.
(Photograph credit: Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)